Bat Monitoring

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Kristin Henderson and Frank McLaughlin monitoring bats

The bat monitoring project has kicked off in earnest. For more information, contact Barbara E.

Results from Rust Monitoring:

in 45 minutes of monitoring:
187 Total Bats id’d. This is the most id’d in any location so far.
90  Big Brown Bat   Eptesicus fuss
  2  Eastern Red Bats.  Lasiurus borealis
37. Hoary Bats. Lasiurus cinereus
58  Silver-haired bats  Laisonycteris noctivagans

Dates for monitoring:

6/13 – Wednesday – IWLA Field
6/15 – Friday – Rust Sanctuary Pond
6/17 – Sunday- IWLA Pond
6/20 – IWLA Field
6/22 – Rust Sanctuary Pond
6/24 – IWLA Pond
6/27 – IWLA Field
6/29 – Rust Sanctuary Pond
7/1 – IWLA Pond
7/4 – IWLA Field

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Summer 2017 Newsletter published

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

You can find the latest newsletter here.

 


Also, don’t forget these important upcoming dates:

August 5th – (Vol) LWC Butterfly count
August 5th (CE) – Bat Program
August 13th – VMN Banshee Reeks picnic
August 15h – Application deadline for new class
Sept 9th – (Vol) Native plant sale
Sept 15-17 – (Lots o’ CE) State VMN Conference

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

2016 Annual Meeting – New officers and board

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailOn November 10th, the VMN Banshee Reeks chapter held an annual meeting.  The election results are:

  • President – Barbara Erlandson
  • Vice President – Frank McLaughlin
  • Secretary – Susan Sims
  • Treasurer – Angie Bommersbach

Board of Director Members:

  • Dave Cazenas
  • Bill Cour
  • Liz Dennison
  • Allison Gallo
  • Thaissa Klimavicz
  • Thomas Letonja

Other Members:

  • Kevin Rose, Chapter Advisor
  • Brian Meyerreicks, Past President & Chapter Agent

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

eBird – a handy tool and a help to science

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailLists

Most people as they start birding on a regular basis decide to start keeping lists.  A life list, a state list, a county list – sometimes it seems that birders are more interested in lists than birds.   Did you know that eBird can BE your list?  If you enter your data regularly into eBird, it shows you a breakdown of your history of sightings by all kinds of different measures.

eBird provides life, year, month lists for a variety of locales

eBird provides life, year, month lists for a variety of locales

Hottest hotspots in Loudoun

Hottest hotspots in Loudoun

Checklists

When going to a new park, many folks pick up the copy of the bird checklist for that park – often a paper copy can be found in the visitor’s center.  Sometimes you go to a new park and there is no checklist, even no visitor’s center.  So you have to guess at what birds are likely and at what else you might have seen.  eBird can provide you a good checklist in all kinds of locations.  For a Hotspot (a publicly shared location like Banshee Reeks), it is based upon what has actually been seen at that location at similar times of the year.   And not just by the season (e.g. Winter), but for the week that you are there visiting.  Further, eBird will highlight which birds are rare – the central point of the feature is to keep the data clean, but it can be very helpful to help you choose between two similar species based upon likelihood.  eBird Mobile can be your notebook/checklist in the field – I find it much easier than scribbling notes down on paper.

Bar charts showing likely locations for a hotspot

Bar charts showing likely locations for a hotspot

Hotspot summary

Region summary

 

Planning

eBird has a few features that help with planning birding trips.  You can look at a particular Hotspot (or even a region) and see what birds are likely by looking at the bar charts for that location.  Or if you know you’ll be in a place, you can explore that region (a country, state, county) and find the Hotspots with the biggest number of species seen.   Next, if you want to see a particular bird, you can explore the data by species and see where you could go to see that bird.  Finally, you can look at a list of target species at a location based upon your life lists.

Target species list - clicking map will show where they might be seen

Target species list – clicking map will show where they might be seen

Alerts and Social

eBird provides the capability to subscribe to alerts – both rare birds (anything that would be flagged by eBird) and ‘Need’ birds.  ‘Need’ birds are birds that you haven’t seen that have been seen in a particular area.  These two features really help to ensure that you are more likely to see a wide variety of birds.  Finally, for each area, eBird will show you who has seen the most birds and who has submitted the most checklists – you can even see recently submitted checklists to see who is recently active.  This can help you connect with other active birders in your area.

Alert subscriptions

Alert subscriptions

The Science

eBird captures all this data and from it the researchers at Cornell (and other institutions) produce many papers and tools.  This dataset is one of the largest ever amassed biodiversity data sets.  eBird is being increasingly used to support Breeding Bird Atlas projects which dramatically reduces the amount of manual effort required to collect and compile the data.

To Get Started

 Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

1 2 3 4